Commonly Misunderstood Dental Facts

General Dentistry New York N.Y.We hear a lot of stories about teeth, and correct people whenever they come into our office with dangerous ideas. But, not everyone is so open with how they view teeth and what they know about them. You may believe things about teeth from television, friends, or outdated information that just doesn’t help you make the best dental decisions. Keep reading for some commonly misunderstood dental ideas.

Sensitive Teeth Mean Cavities

Sensitive teeth can sometimes send people into a panic: they worry that sensitivity means a cavity, or worse. Though sensitive teeth may hint that something is wrong, such as a cavity or a broken tooth, they don’t always mean something serious has happened.

Sometimes a sensitive tooth just signals that you have the beginning of an exposed root. Brushing more gently and using a toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth can often help. But, to be sure, see your dentist and determine if your tooth needs extra care.

Sugar is Sugar

When you take a bite of Halloween candy, the bacteria in your mouth take about twenty seconds to convert that sugar into acid, and that acid can stay in your mouth and on your teeth for about thirty minutes. Think about how much time that acid stays on your teeth next time you sneak a candy or drink a sugary drink.

Try exposing your teeth to less sugar by eating less candy. If you can’t do that, eat it all at once. In fact, eating a larger amount of candy in one go is actually better for your teeth than eating a small amount more spaced out over time.

Baby Teeth Don’t Need Brushing

Unfortunately, that’s not true. Setting your child up with proper dental hygiene habits before they get their adult teeth is key to helping them understand how to keep their teeth healthy. Chances are it will be harder to teach your child to brush their teeth every day when they have their adult teeth if you try to start instilling brushing habits then.

Interested in learning more about teeth, or looking to schedule a visit? Call us at (212) 246-8700 today.

Posted in: Dental Care

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