Dental Trends To Leave Behind In 2018

New year, new you… right? No? Whew, me neither.

Even though we may not have become entirely new people over the course of the last few weeks, wellness is still at the forefront of everyone’s minds. And since dental health is an integral part of our overall health, there are a few key trends you can leave behind to help keep your teeth in their best shape for the year ahead!

Oil Pulling

This is an Ayurvedic technique that involves swishing sesame or coconut oil in the mouth for 20 minutes before spitting it out. In theory, the oil has antibacterial and antiviral properties that can whiten teeth and treat periodontal disease. However, there is no scientific evidence that supports these claims. Oil pulling won’t cause any harm but won’t solve any of your problems either.

Charcoal Toothpaste

Charcoal is a known detoxifying agent in medicine. Due to its porous composition, the idea is that it will absorb any stains on the teeth and make them appear whiter. But, no charcoal-containing toothpaste has been proven to do this. The abrasive particles will help scrub teeth clean but can also do some serious damage by wearing away the outer white enamel layer of the teeth and can actually cause the teeth to look darker!

Apple Cider Vinegar

The benefits of drinking apple cider vinegar seem to be a never ending list—weight loss, helps with digestion, bad breath, even cavities! The dental claims are totally unfounded, plus drinking ACV can cause erosion of the teeth due to it’s acidic pH. (ACV is 3.075 and tooth enamel starts to dissolve at 5.5!)

The keys to keeping your oral health in shape all year round? Brushing twice a day, flossing once a day and regular visits to your dentist—no fancy tricks required. If you have questions about any wellness trends, please let us know!

Can Activated Charcoal Toothpaste Make Your Teeth Whiter?

Dr. Samantha Rawdin clarifies the hype over charcoal toothpaste. Can it really make your teeth whiter?

In accordance with the DIY health remedies that have taken the Internet by storm recently, we wanted to take a closer look at one in particular—activated charcoal toothpaste. Up there with turmeric and matcha, activated charcoal is an increasingly popular wellness trend. It has well documented use in medicine as a detoxifying agent in treating poisonings and overdoses, but does it have a place in dentistry?


Activated charcoal is thought to absorb the stains and impurities that remain on teeth, which can make teeth appear whiter. However, there are no studies that prove this and the long-term effects of using charcoal, both on your teeth and systemically, are unknown. Plus, by just using the activated powder alone, you’re missing out on the benefits of using a fluoridated toothpaste.


What about all of the positive reviews online? Brushing your teeth for 3-5 minutes with any abrasive material is going to make your teeth appear whiter—especially if there was a lack of attention to oral hygiene habits previously.


So, until new research on activated charcoal tells us otherwise, stick with the traditional bleaching products for whitening. If you’re at the drug store and not sure what to buy, just look for the ADA seal of acceptance. It can be found on both toothpastes and at-home whitening products that are proven to be both safe and effective. If you’re interested in learning more about your options for tooth whitening, let us know. We’d be happy to go over them with you!

Tune into our Facebook Live Session Monday April 24th at 4:00 with Dr. Samantha Rawdin to learn the best options for teeth whitening.