Our job isn’t done once you leave the office! We have put together steps on post-operation procedures to make sure your teeth heal and are restored effectively. Please select if you have had:

So you just got VENEERS…

Congrats on going for that beautiful smile! Here are some tips on taking care of your restorations:

  • If you’re still in temporaries—these are a little tricky. Veneers stay in by bonding to your underlying tooth surface. Temporaries can’t bond to the tooth surface. If they did, we wouldn’t be able to get them off. What this means for you? Be gentle with them. Don’t bite into anything hard with your front teeth like an apple or a crusty piece of bread. If they do come off—don’t panic! Call us. We’ll be able to repair it for you.
  • If you’ve just gotten your new restorations—hooray! However, the hard work doesn’t end here. You need to keep these clean just like your natural teeth. That means regular brushing, flossing and check-ups. Veneers don’t last forever. If not properly cared for, the edges can start to break down and this can lead to cavities and fractures of the restorations! Bottom line? Come see us at least twice a year.

Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of complications or recommendations—just the more common things we see. If you should need anything else, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’re here to help!

So you just got a CROWN/BRIDGE…

Here are a few tips on taking care of your restorations!

  • If you’re still in a temporary—these are made of plastic, so try to avoid biting on anything too hard. Don’t chew gum! It will stick to the temporary and maybe even dislodge it. If it does come loose, don’t panic! Call us and let us know. We’ll be able to replace it for you. (If you’re desperate, drug stores typically sell temporary dental cement. Be sure to follow the instructions!)
  • If you’ve just gotten your new restoration—hooray! However, the hard work doesn’t end here. You need to keep these clean just like your natural teeth. That means regular brushing, flossing and check-ups. Crowns and bridges don’t last forever. If not properly cared for, the edges can start to break down and this can lead to cavities! Bottom line? Come see us at least twice a year.
  • If you have sensitivity to cold—this is a normal response to a tooth being prepared, as long as the pain only lasts a second or two and goes away after a few days. If the pain lingers or you develop sensitivity to hot, please let us know right away. This could be an indication that additional work is needed on the tooth. If you have pain on biting, let us know! This can be easily adjusted in the office.

Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of complications or recommendations—just the more common things we see. If you should need anything else, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’re here to help!

So you just started INVISALIGN…

Congrats! You’re on your way to beautiful, healthy, straight teeth. Here are some tips for maintaining your beautiful, healthy new smile!

  • Prior to your retainers being made, continue to wear your last tray. It’s ok to wear this even after your buttons have been removed—the tray should still fit.
  • Retainers should be worn 22 out of 24 hours per day for at least 1 month after treatment is complete. You can then begin to slowly decrease the amount of time that you are wearing them. 3 months after treatment is complete, you can begin wearing the retainers only at night. Basically, you’re only taking these out to eat, drink or brush your teeth.  The trays can be changed weekly, but only if you’re good about wearing them! If the tray you’re wearing is still tight at the end of the week, keep it in for an extra couple of days. If the trays aren’t fitting properly, let us know. Occasionally, there can be interferences that can keep the teeth from moving to the correct position.
  • Continue wearing the retainers for as long as you want your teeth to be maintained in their current position! If you do not continue to wear them, your teeth will shift back.
  • Retainers can be worn for a full year before needing replacement. If it starts to feel loose before then, let us know and a new one can be made.If you have excess saliva—don’t worry, this is a normal response and will go away soon. If the attachments are driving you crazy—you will get used to these also. It just takes a few days. If you’re sore after switching to a new tray, this too is normal. A couple of Advil will usually take away any discomfort.
  • If you have excess saliva—don’t worry, this is a normal response and will go away soon. If the attachments are driving you crazy—you will get used to these also. It just takes a few days. If you’re sore after switching to a new tray, this too is normal. A couple of Advil will usually take away any discomfort.

If you have any other questions, please feel free to reach out to us. We are happy to help!

So you just got an IMPLANT…

The hard part is over—woohoo! Here’s some information on what to expect while healing:

  • In the day or so following the surgery, you may notice some blood in your saliva. A little bit is normal, but if it seems excessive, let us know. If possible, start taking pain medication before the anesthetic wears off. Usually, over the counter pain medication is enough. Using ice or cold packs is helpful for the first day or so to help keep swelling and bruising to a minimum. Try to sleep with your head slightly elevated.
  • If the implants have been covered by your gums and left to heal, after about 4-6 months we’ll need to do another minor procedure to open up the gums.  If you have a temporary or healing abutment attached to the implant, try to avoid chewing in the area and avoid hard foods. Don’t brush the area for the first 7-10 days after the surgery, but be sure to keep the rest of your mouth and teeth nice and clean! When you do start brushing again, no need to brush hard—just effectively.

Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of complications or recommendations—just the more common things we see. If you should need anything else, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’re here to help!

So you just had a tooth extracted…

Whew! Here’s what you can expect over the next few weeks…

  • In the day or so following the surgery, you may notice some blood in your saliva. A little bit is normal, but if it seems excessive, let us know. If possible, start taking pain medication before the anesthetic wears off. Usually, over the counter pain medication is enough. Using ice or cold packs is helpful for the first day or so to help keep swelling and bruising to a minimum. Try to sleep with your head slightly elevated. Pain, swelling and bruising typically peaks 1-2 days after the surgery.
  • If the socket was left open to heal, a blood clot will form in the empty space. You want this clot to stay in place, so try to avoid drinking through a straw, vigorous rinsing, or any action that might dislodge the clot. If the clot does get dislodged, you can end up with a dry socket, which would be accompanied by a sharp pain 2-3 days after the surgery. If this occurs, call us right away.  To ensure that you don’t leave food and debris in the socket, gentle rinsing should be done twice per day.
  • If you had a bone graft placed, don’t be alarmed if you find a few particles in your mouth that have worked their way out. If you had stitches placed, don’t brush the area for the first 10-14 days after surgery. However, make sure you’re still brushing the rest of your teeth to keep them nice and clean!

 

Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of complications or recommendations—just the more common things we see. If you should need anything else, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’re here to help!